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Hull, Marion (1901-1994)

  • Personne
  • 1901-1994

Marion Hull was born in December 1901 in New Westminster, British Columbia. She was actively involved in the church from a young age and later moved with her family to Edmonton. She played for the Edmonton Commercial Graduates (known as “The Grads”) women’s basketball team for one year while in high school. She worked as a secretary in Edmonton and then enrolled at Prairie Bible Institute in Three Hills, Alberta in the early 1930s.

Marguerite Railton was born in Smithville, Ontario in 1904 to a family of five children. She also came from a Christian background. After completing high school, she took teacher’s training at Toronto Normal School in 1922-1923. After two years of teaching in a three-roomed schoolhouse in rural Ontario, she decided to return to school, and completed one year of nurse’s training. She later moved to Edmonton, where her sister Mabel and brother-in-law Gordon Skitch were ministering, and she became actively involved in their church. She later enrolled in the Prairie Bible Institute, where she became Marion Hull’s roommate.

Marion and Marguerite became good friends at Prairie Bible Institute and both felt a call to the ministry during their final year. The district superintendent from the Christian and Missionary Alliance did not wish to send them out to rural areas on their own; however, once it was agreed that they would go together, their “selfless service” began. Over 36 years, they served in five rural communities: Denzil, Saskatchewan (1935-1941); Hythe, Alberta (1941-1949); Daysland, Alberta (1950-1960); Lamont, Alberta (1960-1967); and Mirror, Alberta (1967-1971). Although the Christian and Missionary Alliance did not ordain them, they were regarded as pastors/evangelists, and they actively led Sunday church services and prayer meetings. They also did home visitations and participated in Bible camps and other recruitment activities. They were well-liked in their communities, highly regarded by the Christian and Missionary Alliance, and very successful in nurturing the growth and development of the Alliance churches in the various areas in which they served.

After retiring from Mirror in 1971, Marion and Marguerite moved to Red Deer, Alberta, where they were active members of the Red Deer Alliance Church for 20 years. They moved to Calgary, Alberta in 1991 because of health concerns and to be closer to family. Marion passed away in 1994, and Marguerite passed away in 1998.

Funé, Jean (1902-2000)

  • Personne
  • 18 May 1902-5 January 2000

Rev. Jean Émile Roger Funé (1902-2000) served as a missionary and pastor in the Christian & Missionary Alliance (C&MA) for nearly 50 years. He was born on 18 May 1902, in Ville Favard, France to Eugène & Rachel (Gargot) Funé, and died on 5 January 2000 at his home in Hamilton, Ontario. Funé spent 42 years in Vietnam and Cambodia as a C&MA missionary and five years in Quebec as a missionary and pastor before retiring in 1975.

From 1922 to1925, Jean Funé attended the Nogent Bible School in France. While at Nogent, he received a call to become a missionary to French Indochina. With this in mind, he enrolled at Nyack (N.Y.) Missionary College in 1925. He graduated in 1927 and began his service in Vietnam the following year. Funé used his French citizenship to good advantage. For example, he was instrumental in purchasing land at Dalat, on which the C&MA later built a school for missionaries’ children, and several other strategic properties elsewhere in the country.

Jean married a Canadian, Myrtle Hall (b. 3 April 1905, d. 1 February 1992) in 1935, and together they had two children, George Eugène (b. 25 March 1938) and Esther Marie (b. 30 September 1942). In 1944, the Funés and their children were taken to Hanoi and then Xieng-Khouang, Laos, where they were interned for eight months by the Vichy Government. In 1966, the elder Funés left an increasingly dangerous Vietnam for Cambodia, where they served until 1970, when they began their retirement in Canada. Their retirement was short-lived, as Jean became both the coordinator of C&MA work in Quebec and the pastor of Belvedere Church in Quebec City for five years. In 1975, the Funés moved to Regina, where they worked with Vietnamese refugees.

Funé, Myrtle (1905-1992)

  • Personne
  • 3 April 1905-1 February 1992

Myrtle Amelia hall was born on 3 April 1905 in Colchester North, Essex County, Ontario. After graduating from normal school, she taught high school in Comber and Dorchester. In 1928, she met Jean Funé in Quebec City, where he was pastoring. He left to serve as a missionary to Vietnam that same year, and they began corresponding. Meanwhile, Myrtle enrolled at the Missionary Training Institute in Nyack, NY, to prepare for missionary service. She and Jean were married in 1935, after which she joined him in Vietnam.

Rev. Jean Émile Roger Funé (1902-2000) served as a missionary and pastor in the Christian & Missionary Alliance (C&MA) for nearly 50 years. He was born on 18 May 1902, in Ville Favard, France to Eugène & Rachel (Gargot) Funé. Jean Funé spent 42 years in Vietnam and Cambodia as a C&MA missionary and five years in Quebec as a missionary and pastor before retiring in 1975.

From 1922 to 1925, Jean Funé attended the Nogent Bible School in France. While at Nogent, he received a call to become a missionary to French Indochina. With this in mind, he enrolled at Nyack (N.Y.) Missionary College in 1925. He graduated in 1927 and began his service in Vietnam the following year. Funé used his French citizenship to good advantage. For example, he was instrumental in purchasing land at Dalat, on which the C&MA later built a school for missionaries’ children, and several other strategic properties elsewhere in the country.

Jean and Myrtle had two children, George Eugène (b. 25 March 1938) and Esther Marie (b. 30 September 1942). In 1944, the Funés and their children were taken to Hanoi and then Xieng-Khouang, Laos, where they were interned for eight months by the Vichy Government. In 1966, the elder Funés left an increasingly dangerous Vietnam for Cambodia, where they served until 1970, when they began their retirement in Canada. Their retirement was short-lived, as Jean became both the coordinator of C&MA work in Quebec and the pastor of Belvedere Church in Quebec City for five years. In 1975, the Funés moved to Regina, where they worked with Vietnamese refugees. Myrtle died in Regina, Saskatchewan on 1 February 1992. Jean passed away on 5 January 2000 at his home in Hamilton, Ontario.

Dahms, John V. (1919-1998)

  • Personne
  • 23 April 1919-27 November 1998

John Voelzing Dahms served as professor of New Testament at Canadian Theological College and its successor, Canadian Theological Seminary, from 1971- he became professor emeritus in 1989.

Railton, Marguerite (1904-1998)

  • Personne
  • 1904-1998

Marguerite Railton was born in Smithville, Ontario in 1904 to a family of five children. She also came from a Christian background. After completing high school, she took teacher’s training at Toronto Normal School in 1922-1923. After two years of teaching in a three-roomed schoolhouse in rural Ontario, she decided to return to school, and completed one year of nurse’s training. She later moved to Edmonton, where her sister Mabel and brother-in-law Gordon Skitch were ministering, and she became actively involved in their church. She later enrolled in the Prairie Bible Institute, where she became Marion Hull’s roommate.

Marion Hull was born in December 1901 in New Westminster, British Columbia. She was actively involved in the church from a young age and later moved with her family to Edmonton. She played for the Edmonton Commercial Graduates (known as “The Grads”) women’s basketball team for one year while in high school. She worked as a secretary in Edmonton and then enrolled at Prairie Bible Institute in Three Hills, Alberta in the early 1930s.
Marion and Marguerite became good friends at Prairie Bible Institute and both felt a call to the ministry during their final year. The district superintendent from the Christian and Missionary Alliance did not wish to send them out to rural areas on their own; however, once it was agreed that they would go together, their “selfless service” began. Over 36 years, they served in five rural communities: Denzil, Saskatchewan (1935-1941); Hythe, Alberta (1941-1949); Daysland, Alberta (1950-1960); Lamont, Alberta (1960-1967); and Mirror, Alberta (1967-1971). Although the Christian and Missionary Alliance did not ordain them, they were regarded as pastors/evangelists, and they actively led Sunday church services and prayer meetings. They also did home visitations and participated in Bible camps and other recruitment activities. They were well-liked in their communities, highly regarded by the Christian and Missionary Alliance, and very successful in nurturing the growth and development of the Alliance churches in the various areas in which they served.

After retiring from Mirror in 1971, Marion and Marguerite moved to Red Deer, Alberta, where they were active members of the Red Deer Alliance Church for 20 years. They moved to Calgary, Alberta in 1991 because of health concerns and to be closer to family. Marion passed away in 1994, and Marguerite passed away in 1998.

Roffe, Thelma Wilhelmine (1907-1999)

  • Personne
  • 1907-1999

Thelma Wilhelmine Roffe was the wife and co-worker of Christian and Missionary Alliance missionary to Laos, G. E. Roffe.

George Edward "Ed" Roffe was born in Toronto on February 1, 1905. His father was A.W. Roffe, an influential pastor who served as superintendent of the District of Canada for the Christian and Missionary Alliance from 1919 to 1925.

After graduating from McMaster University and Nyack Missionary College, Roffe was appointed by the Christian and Missionary Alliance (C&MA) to serve as a missionary in French Indochina. In 1928, while studying in France in preparation for travel to Southeast Asia, he was directed by the C&MA to pioneer a new field among the tribal peoples of northern Laos. In 1929, he became the first resident Protestant missionary in north Laos, settling in the city of Luang Prabang. Soon after, Roffe brought his new bride, and recent Nyack graduate, Thelma Wilhelmine Mole (1907-1999) to live and serve there with him.

While on Furlough during World War II, Ed and Thelma Roffe attended two sessions of Wycliffe’s Summer Institute of Linguistics (SIL). Ed Roffe also took advantage of the delay which the war posed to earn his wings, and upon returning to Laos in 1947 became the first missionary pilot in the area. In addition to their ongoing direct evangelistic efforts and administrative duties, the Roffes were also given the responsibility of running a Bible College tasked with raising up indigenous leaders. In 1950, a young student from this school by the name of Kheng was instrumental in sparking a mass movement among the mountain tribal people of northern Laos, which saw whole villages come to Christ in a matter of days. This revival precipitated the formal incorporation of the national church in northern Laos. The “Evangelical Church of Laos” held its first assembly in 1957, with pastor Saly (the first Laotian ordained by the Alliance) as the first president.

In 1951, the Roffes were transferred to the city of Vientiane. After returning to Laos in 1955 from an extended furlough, during which Ed Roffe was able to complete graduate studies in Linguistics at Cornell University, the Roffes were assigned to engage full time in the ministry of translation and literature. In a ten year period they were able to turn out approximately 100 titles, some of them original. Ed Roffe was eventually freed from his other duties to work exclusively on translating into Lao a new version of the New Testament, complete with cross-references, a glossary, a dictionary of unfamiliar terms and a limited concordance. The completed work was presented to the king of Laos in late 1973.

In 1975, the communists took control of the government in Laos, and the Roffes were forced to leave the country. In all, punctuated only by war and furlough, Ed and Thelma Roffe had labored faithfully in Laos for 47 years. Upon their return to North America (Orlando, FL) their ministry to the people of Laos did not come to an end. In addition to monitoring the situation in Laos, the Roffes actively cared for Laotian refugees in their area and helped many get adjusted to North American life. During his retirement years, Ed Roffe was also actively involved in correcting, editing, or translating various documents sent to him for comment.

Ed Roffe died on 14 September 2000. He was predeceased by Thelma, who died in 1999.

Post, Viola Mae (1903-1998)

  • Personne
  • 3 September 1903-2 July 1998

Viola Mae Post (nee Griebenow) was born in Minnesota on 3 September 1903 and died on 2 July 1998. Ms. Post became a Christian when she was 12. During her teenage years her family moved to Salem, Oregon, and after a few years she began attending Simpson Bible Institute in Seattle, Washington. She finished her studies at the Missionary Training Institute. While there, she applied for missionary service. She had initially wanted to serve in China and Tibet but when presented with two possibilities for service, China or the Netherlands East Indies, she chose the latter field. She departed in September 1931 to assist Dr. R. A. Jaffray in the C&MA’s Netherlands East Indies field office. There she met Walter Post, and a year later they were married.

The Posts worked in East Borneo (Kalimantan) for a year and then were sent to Makassar to work in the Bible school there. After their first furlough, they pioneered a mission effort in New Guinea (Irian Jaya), but in 1943, with the advance of the Japanese forces, they were evacuated to Australia. While there, they were asked by the Netherlands Forces Intelligence Service to assist in translation and interrogation work.

They were flown to Makassar in September 1945 to assist in post war rehabilitation. For the next few years Walter served as chairman of the field and taught in the Bible school. In 1952 the Posts were able to return to New Guinea (Irian Jaya) and work in the Bible school there. They ended their missionary service in 1972.

Reynolds, Lindsay (1920-2005)

  • Personne
  • 1920-2005

Lindsay Reynolds (1920-2005), an engineer from Toronto, was a member of an Alliance church from 1935 until his death. His two books Footprints: The Beginnings of The Christian and Missionary Alliance in Canada (Toronto: The Christian and Missionary Alliance in Canada, 1982) and Rebirth: The Redevelopment of the Christian and Missionary Alliance in Canada (Willowdale, Ont.: The Christian and Missionary Alliance in Canada, 1992) chronicle the history of the Christian and Missionary Alliance (C&MA) in Canada from its inception as the Dominion Auxiliary of The Christian and Missionary Alliance in 1889, to its absorption by the American parent body in 1897, to its autonomy in 1981, to its subsequent development in the late 1980’s.

Tozer, A. W. (Aiden Wilson) 1897-1963

  • Personne
  • 21 April 1897-13 May 1963

A. W. (Aiden Wilson) Tozer is perhaps the most widely-known and influential member of the Christian and Missionary Alliance (C&MA). He was born on 21 April 1897 in La Jose (now Newburg) Pa., and died in Toronto, Ont. on 13 May 1963. He was ordained as a minister in the C&MA in 1920 and served pastorates in Toledo, Oh. (1921-23); Indianapolis, Ind. (1923-1928); Chicago, Ill (1928-1959); and Toronto, Ont. (1959-1963). He also served as vice-president of the C&MA (1946-1950) and, most significantly, as editor of the denomination’s official organ The Alliance Weekly (1950-1957) and its successor The Alliance Witness (1958-1963).

Tozer was a convinced evangelical and a staunch supporter of the ideals of the C&MA. His first book, Wingspread: Albert B. Simpson, a Study in Spiritual Altitude (Harrisburg, Ps.: Christian Publications, 1943) was a spiritual biography of the founder of the Alliance. Although loyal to the Alliance, Tozer had an ecumenical spirit. He felt a sense of spiritual community with all true Christians, regardless of their denominational affiliation.

Regarded by many of his admirers as a prophet, Tozer exerted an influence that extended beyond evangelicalism and beyond North America through his insightful books and editorials on the spiritual life. His writings reveal a mystical approach to the Christian life that was founded on his love of the Christian spiritual classics. He was in great demand as a speaker, and during the 1950’s many of his sermons were broadcast over Chicago’s WMBI radio. Tozer wrote nine books during his lifetime, the most influential of which were The Pursuit of God (1948) and The Knowledge of the Holy (1961). An additional twenty volumes of his sermons and editorials have been published since his death. For further biographical information see Fant, David J. A. W. Tozer: A Twentieth Century Prophet (Harrisburg, Pa.: Christian Publications, 1964).

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